Tag: elk

elk-objectives

Why we’re suing to fix elk management

In a few areas of the state elk populations have been allowed to grow to crisis proportions. For example, in hunting district 417 in Fergus County, the elk population is estimated at 4,300 animals—that’s eleven and a half times more than the sustainable population objective set by state wildlife biologists. Excessive elk populations have caused an untenable hardship for the ranchers who provide habitat. This is an area suffering from extreme drought, grasshoppers, and wildfire in recent years. Many cattle producers last year reduced their mother cow herds by 25 percent or more. BLM has notified ranchers in this area of a 30 percent reduction in AUMs for this year due to a shortage of grass. These difficulties are compounded by elk populations grown wildly beyond what is considered...

Continue reading

FWP should help landowners with problematic wildlife

The last few decades in Montana have seen a remarkable recovery in wildlife populations. For example, Montana’s elk population was down to almost 20,000 animals in 1940. By 1970, it had increased somewhat to 55,000. But after that, we’ve seen rapid growth to nearly 160,000 animals today. That’s simply an astounding recovery. And other species, like deer and antelope, are at or near all-time highs as well. The restoration of Montana wildlife is due to a number of factors, but the predominant reason is the efforts of Montana landowners. A great deal of the credit goes to private property owners for changing management practices and improving habitat.  

Continue reading

Consequences of the “Public Trust” doctrine

In the debate over stream access we often hear about the “public trust” doctrine as justification for impeding on private property rights.  Our friends at PERC offer an explanation of how this judicial precedent took on a new life in Montana…and the consequences that it’s had.  Here’s an excerpt: The idea that the public has rights to access resources such as water and wildlife—even if those resources are found on private property—found its way into Montana law through the public trust doctrine. Legal scholars and judges have expanded this historical doctrine beyond its constitutional limits to mean that landowners cannot deny access to resources owned by the public. This expansion infringes on private property rights by taking away the owner’s ability to restrict...

Continue reading

Join our mailing list

© 2019 United Property Owners of Montana. All Rights Reserved

Web design by the Montana Group